Corneal Cross Linking shows good long term results - Cameron Optometry | Cameron Optometry
Corneal Cross Linking shows good long term results

Corneal Cross Linking shows good long term results

Posted on 22nd June 2012

Results of a 2 year study into the long term effects of Corneal Cross Linking (CXL) in people with progressive keratoconus have shown encouraging results.

Corneal cross linking has been gaining a reputation as an important treatment for stabilising progressive keratoconus, but as a relatively new treatment, long term results on its effects are scare.

This study measured various aspects of vision and shape in 40 eyes over 2 years in patients under 18 with progressive keratconus. Visual acuity both with and without correction in contact lenses of glasses but a significant amount and the prescription or power of the eyes reduced a noticeable amount making correction of the vision easier.

Measures of the shape of the cornea also improved over the study with the shape becoming more regular and a reduction of aberrations which are various types of ‘optical interference’ that cause haloes, glare and shadowing in keratoconus.


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