Blind mice see again

Blind mice see again

Posted on 19th April 2012

The journal Nature has published evidence of blind mice being made to see after receiving a transplant of retinal cells.

The mice received an implant of immature retinal rod cells taken from younger mice. After 4-6 weeks they were able to complete a test requiring vision that previously they could only complete by chance.

As always, human trials and possible applicaitons in the treatment of eye disease is still many years off but this is the first evidence that retinal cells can be successfully transplanted and connect properly to the visual system into the new host.

This research follows on from what we previously reported about mice receiving transplants enabling some light perception.

It’s unclear how many blind mice had vision restored but reports suggest somewher between 2 and 4.

Sorry…

 


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