MIT produces self cleaning glass - Cameron Optometry | Cameron Optometry
MIT produces self cleaning glass

MIT produces self cleaning glass

Posted on 03rd May 2012

Boffins at MIT have come up with a new type of glass that resists fogging, eliminates reflections and is ‘self cleaning’.

The surface of the glass is covered with tiny nanocones (1000 times thinner than human hair) which break up reflections and prevent water droplets sticking to the surface causing fogging.

The technology writers are buzzing about the use of the glass to increase the efficiency of solar cells by remaining crystal clean and even more excited about making touchscreens for smartphones out of the glass to prevent those greasy fingerprints grubbing up the screen.

However, at CO we’re more interested in whether it can put an end to finger prints and fogging glasses lenses. Particularly intriguing is the lenses ability to produce no reflections which would the lenses would not need to be anti reflective coated.

We’ll keep watching but in the meantime, you could always try contact lenses…


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