Ian's photo shortlisted for award - Cameron Optometry | Cameron Optometry
Ian’s photo shortlisted for award

Ian’s photo shortlisted for award

Posted on 09th June 2013

A photo by Ian of a CamOpt patient’s eye has been shortlisted for the BCLA’s photographic competition 2013.

b- lens prolapse

This picture shows the natural lens of the eye (the crystalline lens which gets cataract as you get older) has fallen forward into the front chamber of the eye. It’s a wee bit hard to tell what’s going on unless you revise your eye anatomy, so here goes:

b- anatomy

The lens sits behind the iris, the coloured part of the eye and is attached firmly. In some conditions the attachments weaken. In 99.9% of cases the lens falls backward into the back chamber of the eye and you can’t see it, but in this case, it came forward, through the pupil and is quite visible. It’s amazing to see how sharp and neat a structure it is – it looks a like a man made contact lens.

Ian faces stiff competition from researchers and professional medical photographers, so we shall see. You can view the other entries here


Related Posts

Vacancy: practice receptionist

26th October 2021

We are looking for a receptionist to join our friendly team here at Cameron Optometry. The role will primarily involve communicating with patients, and managing the booking system, as well as assistin...

Read more

Has lockdown caused your child’s vision to deteriorate?

05th October 2021

We've definitely seen more cases of myopia in children (short-sightedness) this year, quite possibly due to more screen time in the past 18 months. It's easy to say - "reduce screen time" - but we kno...

Read more

Our children’s eye care team 

27th September 2021

For anyone new to the practice, we thought it would be helpful for us to introduce our optometry team - eight optometrists all with different areas of expertise but all sharing a passion for children'...

Read more

Could coloured lenses help your child at school?

02nd September 2021

Often when children are reluctant readers, it is that they find reading uncomfortable, perhaps experiencing the print moving or jumping around the page or appearing blurred. They may also miss or sk...

Read more